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 Gunsmither or Rifle Wrecker???
 Warped stock on Model 70...
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Rgramjet
New Member

USA
22 Posts

Posted - Dec 01 2006 :  15:35:44  Show Profile Send Rgramjet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I bought a new Winchester Model 70 Featherweight last year. I recently noticed the forend is putting pressure on the barrel pushing it to the left. Short of sanding out this defect on a brand new rifle, what can I do to fix this problem?
Thank you in advance.

luvrifles
Advanced Member



USA
818 Posts

Posted - Dec 01 2006 :  17:42:07  Show Profile Send luvrifles a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If I am unhappy with my purchase I take it back. As far as rifles....I like to tinker. Being a Mod70 I would'nt return it. So tinkering seems a better alternative.

Edited by - luvrifles on Dec 01 2006 17:47:21
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FW
Advanced Member

USA
606 Posts

Posted - Dec 01 2006 :  18:07:03  Show Profile Send FW a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Restock the rifle with a synthetic stock.
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Rgramjet
New Member

USA
22 Posts

Posted - Dec 01 2006 :  19:26:42  Show Profile Send Rgramjet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Whats a good synthetic stock?

Is there any way to bend my current stock back?

thanks
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Kansas Ed
Advanced Member



USA
1206 Posts

Posted - Dec 02 2006 :  14:46:27  Show Profile  Visit Kansas Ed's Homepage Send Kansas Ed a Private Message  Reply with Quote
How does the rifle shoot currently?

Ed

Are we there yet???
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skyline
Advanced Member

Canada
2807 Posts

Posted - Dec 02 2006 :  15:10:26  Show Profile Send skyline a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It is possible to straighten a warped stock in some cases, however without looking at it the best bet is probably to relieve the barrel channel, glass bed the action and seal all of the internal wood surfaces. Some warps are incurable and get worse as time goes by. Lots of wood rifle stocks are produced from blanks that are questionable in the first place and are not seasoned/cured for a long enough period of time in the right humidity.

A synthetic stock is also an option and then there are no warp worries. Lots of good stocks out there. Some are junk.

As Ed said, how does it shoot? Is there a lot of pressure on the barrel from the warped forend, or is it slight? Did you get it wringing wet while hunting since you bought it?

Many variables to consider.
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Rgramjet
New Member

USA
22 Posts

Posted - Dec 03 2006 :  10:53:17  Show Profile Send Rgramjet a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It shoots pretty good groups.

I can straighten the stock with medium thumb pressure.

The Schnabel forend gives me very little room to relieve the barrel.

I had 2 nice 8 pointers in my crosshairs yesterday as I walked to my stand at about 300 yards. All I could think about was the 70 dgree weather we had on Friday and the low 30s Sat. morning. Wasnt sure how that would affect the stock so I didnt shoot.

The rifle has never been more than damp from a light mist.
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Tommy B
Advanced Member



USA
724 Posts

Posted - Dec 03 2006 :  13:54:12  Show Profile Send Tommy B a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I would have to say McMillan stocks are hands down the best synthetic stocks out there right now. They are expensive but worth there weight in gold you get what you pay for. The only thing that sucks is they are so busy there is a 12 to 16 week waiting period. It took 14 weeks for the A5 that I got but when it came in it was worth the wait. HS Precision also makes a good stock I have a few of them and have no complaints but favor the McMillan.

here are the links:
http://www.mcmfamily.com/mcmillan/index.asp

http://www.hsprecision.com/

Im not a hunter, Im a population control specialist!
Long distance call? Dial 1-900-338-LAPUA

Edited by - Tommy B on Dec 10 2006 12:29:26
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Wolfgang
Advanced Member

3338 Posts

Posted - Feb 03 2007 :  06:53:04  Show Profile  Visit Wolfgang's Homepage Send Wolfgang a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Warped wood on Win's & Rem's is fairly common as they take no action to seal the internal surfaces. Most will twist to a point and stop, if you remove the stock, put it in a warm dry place to drop the moisture content then re-fit it and completely seal it, usually it'll stay put.

As someone else said, some stocks are worse than others and they will continue to twist somewhat even after re-fitting and sealing. This is caused by young wood with a less dense structure (sorry, I forget the technical term for this).

Avoid the plastic based sealers like polyurethane, it causes problems of it's own on stocks and can make a good piece of wood appear to be junk. Tung oil is the way to go. It's going to darken the wood a bit but not much. Put as much on as the wood will take on the first coat, as it soaks in, just keep feeding it maintaining a wet surface. When you get it to the point where the woos won't readily take anymore and the surface will stay wetted for at least a minute, hang it level to cure, flip 180 every 12 hours for five to ten days. If you don't have any build-up, give it 3-5 more light coats (applied by HVLP spray is best) over the next 3-5 days. If you get any build-up wipe the surface with a rag dampened in mineral spirits to remove it, don't try to scrape or sand it off. Surface will dry over a week or so and leave a non-sticky, non-shiny finish that will resist moisture.

Synthetic stocks are NOT warp-proof! I've seen some top shelf multi-composite (carbon/poly/glass) that twisted like a pretzel. Any number of things can kill a synthetic from oils & solvents to plain old sunlight. I'm not talking the $29.99 plastic crap stocks for the Mosin-Nagant's either, I'm talking expensive to insanely priced multi-composite's that are supposed to be indestructable. Any number of things can cause problems with synthetics, from minor mfg flaws that don't show up till later to problems caused during fitting and or bedding. Friend of mine had one of his rifles fitted with a top quality $450 multi-composite stock. Worked great till he got to BC for a trophy hunt in -20F temps and he couldn't put a round on the paper at 100 yards. There were two problems, one being the bedding compound used during the fitting, the other was a mfg problem where the structural shape of the stock to fit this rifle removed the strength reqired for it to retain its strength. Of course the stock mfg didn't admit to the mfg'ing problem and blamed the failure on the bedding compound...customer ate the cost even though the stock was twisted well past the point where any bedding compound was applied.

"Carry the battle to them. Don't let them bring it to you. Put them on the defensive and don't ever apologize for anything."
Harry S. Truman
mark@fire-iron.biz
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Bob from Idaho
Average Member



USA
99 Posts

Posted - Jun 19 2008 :  03:44:10  Show Profile Send Bob from Idaho a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Take the barreled action out of the stock. Find a long socket wrench near the size of the barrel channel. Wrap it in a medium grit sandpaper. Sand til you have a little clearance all around the barrel when you put it back in the stock. I like to be able to slide a dollar bill between the barrel and the stock all the way to the recoil lug.

Apply some finish to the sanded area and when it's dry assemble the rifle. I use Birchwood Casey's True Oil, you can get it at most sporting goods stores for refinishing gun stocks, but any good waterproof clear finish will work.

Go out and shoot it.

You can never own enough guns
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Paul B
Advanced Member

3316 Posts

Posted - Jun 20 2008 :  03:02:41  Show Profile Send Paul B a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have two Winchester M70 Featherweights like yours. I had my gunsmith glass bed the action and free float the barrels on them and they shoot good, so that can ve done. I also have five rifles in McMillan stocks, two of which are in the Featherweight style. I haven't had a chance to do any load work up for the .338 Win. mag. yet, but the .270 is one otf the most accurate rifles I've ever owned. When I first shot the rifle in getting it generally sighted for the first time, Winchester 150 gr. Power points averaged .75". My pet load uses the now fairly long discontimued WMR powder. The average groups with that powder run right at the .50" level. FWIW, the velocity is just a bit above 2900 FPS with the 150 gr. Speer Hot-core.
My only gripe with the McMillan stocks is they are a bit heavier than I care for.
If you want to do a glass bed and free float job, I can highly recommend the Harry Lawson Company here in Tucson. They do all my gunsmithing work including a couple of custom rifles. They ain't cheap but like they say, you only get what you pay for.
Paul B.
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Kansas Ed
Advanced Member



USA
1206 Posts

Posted - Jun 29 2008 :  17:23:45  Show Profile  Visit Kansas Ed's Homepage Send Kansas Ed a Private Message  Reply with Quote
If you have a good smith who specializes in custom wood, chances are they can "pull" the stock to work. We have a local guy Jim Greenwood, who can do the most amazing things with wood. I've seen him warp stocks so far for a right handed left eye dominant shooter that would make you think it's impossible...that being said, if the rifle shoots good in all weather, POI doesn't change appreciably dependant on the humidity or temperature, I wouldn't do anything. Sometimes it's in us as gun people to find fault where there isn't any functional reason to. Shoot a lot, and if it's a problem do something about it, but if it's just a pet peeve to see it there, then ignore it.

Ed

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